Origin Guide – Dan Brown's Origin Guide
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Origin Guide – Dan Brown's Origin Guide

Chapter 3

Chapter 3: Guggenheim Museum Atrium, Bone Conduction Headphones, Installation for Bilbao - Jenny Holzer

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Atrium of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

Atrium of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao

Credits: Leslie Styles

Atrium Guggenheim Bilbao

Crédits: Guggenheim Bilbao

The atrium of the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao makes the bridge between the exterior and the interior of the museum. Composed largely of glass walls, the view is stunning on the Nervion (the Spanish city river) and the light penetrates the enclosure of the building to the delight of the visitors.

A preview of an amateur video of the museum’s Atrium for a better understanding of the futuristic architecture of the building as seen by Robert Langdon.

Bone Conduction Headphones

Bone Conduction Headphones

Crédits: audilo

Bone conduction headphones technology allows sound to be diffused to the inner ear through the bones of the skull rather than transmitted inside the ear as more conventional headphones.

Beethoven - Bones conduction

As Langdon evokes in the book, the first to use this concept was indeed Beethoven when he began to become deaf. The latter clamped between his teeth a conductive rod clamped to the box of his piano to determine the notes thanks to their reasoning in his jaw.

Today, there are many models of bone conduction headphones on the market for different prices (between 40 and 150 $ on average depending on whether wired or wireless headphones …):

The quality of listening is confusing at first glance because one tends to compare it with more traditional air headphones, but once accustomed, this type of headphones brings a real added value of listening and do not damage the eardrums which are not solicited.

Installation for Bilbao – Jenny Holzer

Installation for Bilbao - Jenny Holzer

Credits: guggenheim-bilbao

Installation for Bilbao - Holzer

Credits: Wikipedia

Jenny Holzer is an American conceptual artist working on the diffusion of messages, on language and its representation. She created this work for the inauguration exhibition of the museum in 1997 and is now a permanent work of the Guggenheim Museum of Bilbao.
There are 9 columns of LEDs over 12m high. The columns broadcast messages in Spanish, Basque and English in the form of aphorisms around the theme of death, loss and intimacy (around AIDS).

Here is a video of the animated work:

Next chapter: Chapter 5

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