Origin Guide – Dan Brown's Origin Guide
Origin Guide – Dan Brown's Origin Guide

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Origin Guide – Dan Brown's Origin Guide

Chapter 20

Chapter 20: The Large Hadron Collider, Hamid al-Ghazali and the stars

djodjo

Stars: Véga, Bételgeuse, Rigel, Algebar, Deneb, Acrab, Kitalpha

Carte des étoiles

Star Véga

From the arabic: al waki, la lyre
White star ranked in 5th position of the most luminous stars of the sky. It is about 25.3 light-years away from Earth.

Star Bételgeuse

From the arabic: ibt al-ghül
Red supergiant star about 427 light-years away. At its maximum, it is about ten thousand times more luminous than the Sun and its mass would be thirty times greater. It is the star alpha of the constellation of Orion sometimes also called Al Mankib.

Star Algebar or Rigel

From the arabic: Rijl Jauzah al Yusra
Blue supergiant star. Its radius is 74 times greater than that of the Sun and its luminosity is 50,000 times greater, it is the 7th brightest star in the sky.

Star Deneb

From the arabic: al dhanab al dajajah
White star about 3,260 light-years away. It is the alpha star of the constellation of the Swan which together with Vega and Altair forms the “Summer Triangle”.

Star Acrab or Beta Scorpii

From the arabic: al Aqrab
Multiple star located in the Scorpion constellation, 530 light-years away.

Star Kitalpha ou Alpha Equulei

From the arabic: qiṭ‘a al-faras
The white star, about 186 light-years away, is the brightest star in the constellation of the little horse.


Hamid al-Ghazali

Abū Ḥamid Moḥammed ibn Moḥammed al-Ghazālī (1058-1111), known in the West as Algazel, is a Sufi of Persian origin. Emblematic figure in the Muslim culture, theologian represents the dogmatic mysticism.

Hamid al-Ghazali


Desertron Project, Hadron Collider

Desertron Project, Hadron Collider

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle accelerator located in the border region between France and Switzerland. It is the most powerful particle accelerator built to date, commissioned in 2008 and improved in 2015 after two years of shutdown.

 Hadron Collider

In 2012, it confirmed the existence of the Higgs boson.

Next chapter: Chapter 22

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